Apple Cider Donuts

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Apples are aplenty this season–we’ve sampled so many good apples from several of our local orchards. This past weekend my husband and I traveled alittle over an hour from home to visit one of our favorite apple stands –Bauer’s Market Place  and loaded up on them.   We also picked up a couple loaves of their famous Apple Fritter bread and two gallons of apple cider.  Sunday  I made some Apple Cider donuts from a recipe I found here.

Since we were near downtown La Crosse WI we decided to find a place along the waterfront to get a bite to eat.

Lacrosse view

While the view was breathtaking–the food, combined with poor service, and the noise level, were not. Two hot sandwiches that were served cold with cold fries for $40.00 was a bit extreme even for waterfront. Worse yet it was during the dinner hour and we were the only 2 customers eating–with one other table of 4 customers enjoying a liquid dinner.

But ah oh yes that view…

Once home I attempted to make my long anticipated apple hand pies with caramel drizzled over the top, but since we were wanting to take them on a picnic the next day–I did not make the caramel to go with them. Also, pressed for time, I did not make my pie crust from scratch. Big mistake. They tasted good but next time I’m going to take the time to make homemade crust and also the caramel–because what’s an apple without caramel?

Best Apples for Cooking and Baking here

Recipe for Cider Glazed Apple Bundt Cake here

Last but never least the final picture of my last two tomato plants–still producing in October.

Most years, just like a lot of other people, when October arrives everything in containers on our deck is basically brown/dead looking. This year is no different. But instead of rushing things I’m letting nature run its course. My plants are still producing tomatoes –they’re still hanging on so I’m going to let them live out their best lives. This coming weekend there is supposed to be frost so time will tell if this years garden season has come to an end and it is time to clean it all up. Everyone on social media seems to be rushing things–first it was fall/halloween mid-August and now some are rushing to Christmas.  At almost 55 I ‘m so over rushing time. Time does a wonderful job of that all on its own. I’m trying to slow time down in any and every way I can. It’s the first week of October for heaven’s sake not mid December lol… Until next time Happy Fall. We are on vacation until the third week of the month celebrating early our 25th (Silver) Wedding Anniversary.

Tomato Tortellini Soup

I’ve needed this soup lately. This fall has been a bit trying. We live in an area that up until six months ago was fairly quiet. Suddenly construction started around us everywhere. There has been construction on the interstate that starts up at midnight and goes on until we get up. While I realize this is the only time some of these repairs can get done– we get no sleep during these times.  Most of the construction has involved machinery that digs down deep into the cement, tears it up, chews it up, and then a truck backs up (beep, beep, beep) and collects it. Then during the day, there is construction from 6am until 6pm right across the street. On the weekends the property manager for us has been trying to have the driveway and parking lot fixed, so you guessed it over a month now of construction right outside our door. My husband sleeps right through it, me not so much. Six months of this and I’ve reached my limit. Here’s hoping for finished construction projects and long cool nights of sleep in my future.

Here’s the recipe for the Tomato Tortellini Soup 

There is nothing better after a long day of work on little sleep than a good hearty tomato soup. You will love the Tomato Tortellini, it’s easy to make and yummy.

This month has been busy already with processing squash to eat this winter, visiting nearby lavender farms, zoos, even a corn maze, and of course visiting local apple orchards and buying lots, and lots of apples for eating and applesauce.

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I hope your fall is going great!

Corned Beef Cabbage & Brine

corned beef and cabbage

Corned Beef and Cabbage time are almost here again! Have I told you that Reuben’s are my favorite sandwich? There’s a wonderful deli in Madison WI called Ella’s Deli that makes a delicious Reuben. Whenever I’m craving this sandwich, it’s off to Ella’s I go. The question addressed in this post is to brine or not to brine. I brine. This wasn’t always the case. I follow the process found here at the Cooking Channel blog and it works like a charm every time. For leftovers, I make sandwiches but will also serve the corned beef with coleslaw on Irish soda buns to pep it up some before I get tired of eating it altogether. The recipe I follow for the Irish soda buns is here at Martha Stewart’s website. I don’t eat meat, well red meat, at all. I do however make an exception on St. Patrick’s Day. This year I don’t have to pretend to be Irish, as recently I’ve discovered that I am 27%, Irish. I shall celebrate this lovely day this year in honor of my Irish ancestors.

I found this poem on an Irish Culture and Customs site here.

GOOD GRIEF – NOT BEEF!

I just want to put something straight
About what should be on your plate,
If it’s corned beef you’re makin’
You’re sadly mistaken,
That isn’t what Irishmen ate.

If you ever go over the pond
You’ll find it’s of bacon they’re fond,
All crispy and fried,
With some cabbage beside,
And a big scoop of praties beyond.

Your average Pat was a peasant
Who could not afford beef or pheasant.
On the end of his fork
Was a bit of salt pork,
As a change from potatoes ’twas pleasant.

This custom the Yanks have invented,
Is an error they’ve never repented,
But bacon’s the stuff
That all Irishmen scoff,
With fried cabbage it is supplemented.

So please get it right this St. Paddy’s.
Don’t feed this old beef to your daddies.
It may be much flasher,
But a simple old rasher,
Is what you should eat with your tatties.

©Frances Shilliday 2004

Happy St. Patrick’s Day on the 17th!!

 

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